Long exposure to tiny amounts of Monsanto’s Roundup may damage liver, kidneys

Long-term intake of the Monsanto’s most popular Roundup herbicide, even in very small amounts lower than permissible in US water, may lead to kidney and liver damage, a new study claims.

The research, conducted by an international group of scientists from the UK, Italy and France, studied the effects of prolonged exposure to small amounts of the Roundup herbicide and one of its main components – glyphosate.

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Three arrested in Paris over ‘devil’s breath’

Police have seized two Chinese women and a man in Paris suspected of using a powerful Colombian drug dubbed “the devil’s breath” that turns victims into “zombies” devoid of free will and rob them.

It is thought the three are part of an international Triad-style criminal gang running a multimillion-pound operation around the planet.

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Hawaii’s spike in birth defects puts focus on GM crops

Nelson, a Californian, and other local doctors find themselves in the eye of a storm swirling for the past three years around the Hawaiian archipelago over whether a major cash crop on four of the six main islands, corn that’s been genetically modified to resist pesticides, is a source of prosperity, as the companies claim – or of birth defects and illnesses, as the doctors and many others suspect.

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Police secretly track cellphones to solve routine crimes

In one case after another, USA TODAY found police in Baltimore and other cities used the phone tracker, commonly known as a stingray, to locate the perpetrators of routine street crimes and frequently concealed that fact from the suspects, their lawyers and even judges. In the process, they quietly transformed a form of surveillance billed as a tool to hunt terrorists and kidnappers into a staple of everyday policing.

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The Hard Lives of Britain’s Synthetic Marijuana Addicts

Legal highs are set to be outlawed by the British government in response to a growing number of news reports about students overdosing on the synthetic drugs after using them recreationally. On the eve of the ban, VICE travelled to Manchester to meet some more vulnerable users who have become addicted to these over-the-counter substances and discovered that solving the problem won’t be as simple as making legal highs illegal.

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Facial Recognition Software Moves From Overseas Wars to Local Police

Facial recognition software, which American military and intelligence agencies used for years in Iraq and Afghanistan to identify potential terrorists, is being eagerly adopted by dozens of police departments around the country to pursue drug dealers, prostitutes and other conventional criminal suspects. But because it is being used with few guidelines and with little oversight or public disclosure, it is raising questions of privacy and concerns about potential misuse.

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